Thursday, March 9, 2017

Literacy in Math


Hey Folks!
So I have been seriously into math and reframing my pedagogy surrounding my math instruction.  I am participating in the revision of Ohio Department of Education's Model Curriculum. I have to say, I am working with some amazing people. Like not kidding. Amazing educators who have worked tirelessly to restructure teacher's thinking, and GET OUT OF THE WAY. My biggest takeaway has been to get out of the kid's way, and let them work. Let them explore and learn and ask questions and work cooperatively and talk to each other {and you!}.  And I have been working on doing this in my classroom. Let me just say... It's HARD! I have had to put down the Expo marker and let my students go. I have had to restructure my instructional framework, and put our tools at kid level. And boy... Have I watched them soar!


Over the past couple weeks I have been trying to incorporate more literature focused math mini lessons that required my students to solve a problem, use a series of skills, or solve multi-step problems. One of the literature pieces we used was a poem from Shel Silverstein called Band-Aids.

As you can see, this is a super fun poem that you could obviously use to teach lots of literacy elements, but for our purposes, we used it for math!

Here's what we did:

  • Day One 
    • Read the poem and discussed the literacy elements
    • Acted it out
  • Day Two
    • Read the poem {repeat, choral, boys and girls, etc}
    • Underlined the number words and discussed the meaning of the number word
      • Actually, the students suggested we do this! We talked about how number words mean the same thing as the numeric representation as well as the quantity the number words represent.
    • Discussed how we could figure out the quantity of Band-Aids
      • The students decided to number the lines
      • Divide the poem 
        • Each pair of students ended up getting two lines, and had to figure out the quantity within each line
      • Students used LOTS of strategies to figure out how many bandaids were in each pair of lines
      • Students presented how they found their quantities to the class
  • Day Three
    • Students worked in pairs or teams to figure out how to add all of the numbers together!
    • Students shared their strategies


We had stuff everywhere! But it was fun, and engaging, and challenging, and cooperative, and all things good. I know I have a long way to go, but dang, I have got to be on the right road at least!